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based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind them makes sure that india's city is still vulnerable. >> for more on today's violence, i spoke with the ambassador who formerly served as u.s. assistant secretary of state for south asian affairs. he is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. i started by asking who he thought could be behind the attacks. >> well, i know one thing, that mumbai, it is a very sad day for mumbai, the fourth attack in the last 10 years. this city has been attacked by terrorists on many occasions, and this is the latest episode. it does not appear to be the same nature of attack that occurred in november of 2008, the suicide bombers that attacked in mumbai, killing 166 people that were tied to the l.e.t., a pakistani-based militant group. this appears to be more sporadic. it does not appear to be the same kind of attack. india has seen these before by a group called north dakota and mehanna hedin. it is an indigenous group. they have done thes
correspondent pamela constable, about her new book on pakistan's double game with the >> it's always sort of had this nuanced, subtle, denied unclear relationship with all these militant groups. but now it's all come back to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vie
rooms in brussels, can do about it. >> they were the worst floods in pakistan's history and a year ago today torrents of water were tearing through villages, destroying everything in their path. almost 2,000 people killed and 2 million homes destroyed. many families are still struggling with little help from the authorities. we have a report from northwest pakistan. >> the rainy season is just starting again. harmless as the water looks now, it has filled people here with dread. it is brought back the memory of images like these from last year, heaviest rains ever recorded reeked havoc across pakistan. nearly 20 million people were affected. this village was one of the first places the flood struck. people here had no warning of the disaster that was coming their way. villagers say a massive wall of water came through here from that direction and hit the village and destroyed a lot of the houses and caused a lot of deaths. in fact, a year on they still haven't found all of the bodies of those who were swept away. this woman did manage to find her two teenage daughters, but it took days
in iraq after the withdrawal deadline in december. officials in pakistan today played down a u.s. decision to suspend $800 million in military aid. u.s. officials confirmed it on sunday. but, a pakistani spokesman insisted today that operations would continue without external support. tensions between the two nations have escalated since the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden inside pakistan. reports in britain now say former prime minister gordon brown was one of the victims of phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper "news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times"
warned there would be harsh punishment for anyone found guilty of negligence in the sinking. in pakistan, intelligence officials reported u.s. drone aircraft, firing missiles, killed at least 42 suspected militants in less than 24 hours. four missile strikes targeted sites in tribal areas near the afghan border, beginning late monday night. u.s. and pakistani relations have been increasingly tense since the raid that killed osama bin laden. a u.s. army ranger was awarded the nation's highest military award, the medal of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any se
is in captivity. that's happened, for instance, in pakistan with a man named umar, a columnist, who was abducted and sexually assaulted. he was sodomized in retribution for his writing. >> warner: a lot of these victims at least the women, have never told their stories before to anyoee other than friends or family. why not? >> there are a number of reasons. the biggest one i heard from international correspondents was the fear of losing assignments. i have spoken to at least two journalists that told me that they were taken off assignments specifically because they came forward to talk about their sexual assault. so it really does happen. they don't want to be appear to be weak or vulnerable. women told me repeatedly that they had worked very hard to overcome this sense that they were the weaker gender in this profession and that them didn't feel that they could reveal that they had been raped without it making them look somehow more vulnerable.รงรง there are also.... >> warner: what about the local reporters? what were usually their reason for not saying anything? >> a lot of different cultura
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you here moaynd here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org vo:geico, committed to providing service to its auto insurance customers for over 70 years. more information on auto insurance at geico.com or 1-800-947-auto any time of the day or night.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8